Executive’s Guide to the Few Acceleration Metrics that Matter

This is the final post in a six-part series on each of the Categories of Focus suggested by the new standard Open Customer Metrics Framework (OCMF). Learn more about this modern, open framework and its five categories of focus in my first post on this topic.

OCMF suggests that executives should spend about 10% of their time on things that make a difference — the “Acceleration category”.

You know how crazy this sounds. We barely have enough time to deal with our day-to- day (and overnight) emergencies as it is.

Read more

Executive’s Guide to the few knowledge metrics that matter

This is part five of a six-part series on each of the Categories of Focus suggested by the new standard Open Customer Metrics Framework (OCMF). Learn more about this modern, open framework and its five categories of focus in my first post on this topic.

OCMF suggests that executives should spend about 20% of their time on knowledge management – the “Knowledge/Collaboration category”.

For those of you keeping score at the office, this is the *same* percentage focused on customers and employees. Yes, it is that important. Your employees know this.

Klever’s State of Knowledge Sharing 2016 survey asked the following question: “If people in your workplace were sharing knowledge as well as they possibly could, it would improve productivity by:”

Nearly 50% of respondents believe that their organization could be at least 30% more productive if they shared knowledge better. Think about that the next time you think knowledge management is too fuzzy a concept to address.

Read more

Executive’s Guide to the few ‘business’ metrics that matter

This is part four of a six-part series on each of the Categories of Focus suggested by the new standard Open Customer Metrics Framework (OCMF). Learn more about this modern, open framework and its five categories of focus in my first post on this topic.

OCMF suggests that executives should spend about 30% of their time on the needs of the business – the “Business Category” — which we’ll walk through here.

Leading customer success and support organizations have realized that we have fixated on cost and efficiency at the expense of a superior customer (and employee) experience or the value delivered. This is one category where we should pull back on some of what we currently measure and report on, to free up mind share to think about and act on some of the other categories of measures.

Read more